Veego 750 review: A high-speed electric bike for commuting, hauling, cruising or just plain fun


The Veego 750 from Florida-based RideScoozy may not look like a powerhouse at first glance, but this e-bike rocks some serious giddy-up. Combined with its nice loadout of comfortable touch points and quality components, the Veego 750 makes for an awesome ride that doesn’t skimp on the performance.

RideScoozy Veego 750 Tech Specs

  • Motor: 750W (1,400 W peak) geared rear hub motor
  • Top speed: 45 km/h (28 mph) with pedal assist, 32 km/h (20 mph) with throttle
  • Range: 50-80 km (30-50 mi)
  • Battery: 52V 17.5Ah (910 Wh)
  • Charge time: 4-6 hours
  • Max load: 129 kg (285 lb) total; or 45 kg (100 lb) on just the rear rack
  • Bike weight: 31.3 kg (69 lb)
  • Suspension: GTMRK adjustable air suspension fork with lockout
  • Brakes: Tektro 180mm disc brakes hydraulic
  • Tires: 20″ x 4″ Kenda Krussade fat tires
  • Price: $1,999 (currently on sale from $2,299 MSRP)
  • Extras: Comfortable Cloud 9 cruiser saddle, color LCD display with speedometer, wattmeter, battery gauge, PAS level indicator, odometer, tripmeter, front and rear LED lights, half-twist throttle, Shimano 7-speed transmission, USB charging port, integrated rear rack as part of frame, included fenders, 3A fast charger included as standard

Veego 750 Video Review

Power and comfort combined into one

I previously checked out the former version of the Veego 750 a few years ago, but RideScoozy has made some serious upgrades since then. The bike started out great, but the new updates make it an ever better offer – and an even better deal.

I’ve seen a lot of comfort e-bikes, and I’ve seen a lot of powerful e-bikes, but I rarely see them combined so well, and that’s exactly what the Veego 750 offers.

The true 750W motor really offers a peak power output of 1,400W thanks to that 52V electrical system and high current controller. This means that the bike can dump a lot of power at the twist of the throttle for speedy acceleration or more powerful hill climbing. The motor’s 80 Nm of torque make quick work of both. The bike also gets up to 28 mph (45 km/h) on pedal assist, making it a Class 3 e-bike – or, you can stick to Class 2 throttle operation at 20 mph. Whatever floats your boat.

But the bike isn’t just a hot rod – it’s also a comfortable cruiser. The Cloud-9 saddle is about as big as cruiser saddles can get. Between the soft material, padded sections, and the springs underneath the saddle, you’re basically settling your caboose into a cloud – then, the front air suspension fork helps smooth out the front end, and the big 4″ wide tires soak up anything the suspension or saddle miss.

The tires have a lot of air volume thanks to their fat tire nature, but the 20″ diameter is still fairly small to keep the bike nimble. It also reduces the bike’s height meaning a lower possible saddle height; RideScoozy says it will fit riders from 5’4″ to 6’2″. The step-through design makes the bike easy to mount as well, especially for shorter riders. But even taller folks will enjoy not needling to throw a long, gangly leg over the entire bike.

I also love the way the rims use a cast wheel design instead of spoked wheels., which means that you never have to deal with spoke maintenance, and in my opinion it just looks cooler too.

The bike doesn’t necessarily fold in the traditional sense, but the handlebars do fold down. That makes the bike shorter, meaning you might be able to slide it under a desk or table.

Another note about the bike’s design is the frame-integrated rear rack. It’s extra sturdy because it’s not a bolt-on rack, but rather it’s part of the frame. They say it can support up to 100 lb (45 kg), so that means you can easily get a seat on back for carrying kids, or potentially even a very lightweight adult (though there aren’t any footpegs for adult feet).

I hate to keep saying, “But wait, there’s more!”. But there really is.

The list of nice parts just keeps going on. There are hydraulic disc brakes for low-maintenance and high power stoppers. There are included fenders so they won’t nickel and dime you for adding fenders to the bike. The LED lights are nice and bright, not just dinky lights that check the box but don’t throw much of a beam.

And I haven’t even gotten to the battery yet! The dang thing is massive at 910 Wh. The 52V system means it has more power than a typical 48V battery (though its only about 7-8% more power than a 48V battery – some people might not feel the difference). But the 17.5 Ah is definitely perceptible because it means extra long range.

They say 30-50 miles, and that’s absolutely doable. On throttle-only riding at 20 mph, a big ol’ battery like this can easily net you 30 miles of range. If you want to add some pedal assist, you can go even further.

At the bike’s price of $1,999 (currently on sale from the $2,299 MSRP), this is a solid option. Yes, there are cheaper e-bikes out there. I know someone’s going to throw the Lectric XP 2.0 at me in the comments, but I’d argue that the Veego’s price makes it worth it thanks to its nearly twice as much power and twice as much range, plus high quality parts like the hydraulic disc brakes and super comfortable saddle. Those upgrades give you a better riding experience that lasts longer and is frankly more fun.

This isn’t a budget e-bike, and so if you’re looking for bang-for-your-buck, there are more affordable options out there. But as a high quality yet still affordable fat tire e-bike, the Veego 750 sticks the landing in pretty much every metric.

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